Tesla posts surprise Q2 profit, ramping up cash despite coronavirus

Tesla (TSLA) posted a profit in the second quarter, defying Wall Street estimates after the electric car-maker delivered more vehicles than expected in the quarter despite virus-related disruptions.

Here were the main results from Tesla’s Q2 report, compared to consensus estimates compiled by Bloomberg:

  • Revenue: $6.04 billion vs. $5.4 billion expected vs. $6.35 billion Y/Y

  • GAAP earnings per share: 50 cents, vs. GAAP loss per share of $1.06 expected and GAAP loss per share of $2.31 Y/Y

  • Free cash flow: $418 million, vs. outflow $617.9 million expected

Tesla’s second-quarter results came on the heels of an incredible 280% stock rally for the year to date as investors bet on the company’s long-term prospects, with the coronavirus pandemic weighing more heavily on established auto competitors. The near-fourfold increase in Tesla’s stock made it the second-best performer in the Nasdaq 100 after Moderna (MRNA), and rocketed Tesla’s market

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Wirecard Exposes Big 4 Accounting Lapses Endure Post-Enron

(Bloomberg) — Two decades of financial disasters from Enron Inc.’s collapse in 2001 to Wirecard AG’s meltdown have left the Big Four accounting firms facing a major cultural problem that regulators may struggle to resolve.

The 1.9 billion euros ($2.1 billion) missing from Wirecard’s balance sheet brought the chief executive officer’s arrest, the German payments firm’s insolvency filing and a lot of finger-pointing. Some have blamed German regulator BaFin for its oversight failures. Wirecard’s auditor, Ernst & Young, called it an “elaborate” fraud that even a very rigorous probe may not have discovered.

But EY is also on the hot seat. It was added to a class-action style lawsuit against Wirecard on Tuesday, and stands accused of failing in its most fundamental duty. It’s a systemic problem facing not just EY, but also the other members of the Big Four: KPMG, Deloitte and PriceWaterhouseCoopers, according to Atul Shah, an accounting

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People’s Bank of China Cuts Stake in India’s Housing Development Finance

(Bloomberg) — China’s central bank has sold at least some of its stake in India’s Housing Development Finance Corp., according to shareholder details filed with the exchanges.

The People’s Bank of China has dropped off the list of investors holding at least a 1% stake in the company as of end-June. The PBOC held about 17.5 million shares, accounting for a 1.01% shares, at end-March. It cannot be ascertained if the Chinese central bank continues to holds any stake in the mortgage lender or not.

The PBOC may have sold at least a part of its shares in the open market, Hindu Business Line newspaper reported earlier, citing market sources. HDFC shares fell as much as 2.2% in Mumbai in early trading Friday. The stock dropped 40% from its January record high to its April low but has since rebounded 27%.

PBOC had increased its stake in India’s largest shadow

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German Finance Minister Knew of Wirecard Issues a Year Before Collapse

(Bloomberg) — German Finance Minister Olaf Scholz was aware of potential market manipulation at Wirecard AG almost a year and a half before the company collapsed, putting pressure on a key figure in Angela Merkel’s government.

Financial watchdog BaFin informed Scholz in February 2019 about the case “because of the suspicion of a violation against the prohibition of market manipulation,” according to a report by the Finance Ministry seen by Bloomberg.

His early knowledge of the allegations swirling around Wirecard increases scrutiny on the highest-ranking Social Democrat in Merkel’s coalition and lays bare the delicate political dynamics just over a year before the next election.

Presented to the heads of the parliamentary finance committee on Thursday evening, the report creates a new opening for critics who accuse German authorities of being too lax by failing to pursue fraud allegations of a company that aspired to be a leading light in

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Germany to overhaul accounting regulation after Wirecard scandal

Markus Braun, former chief executive of Wirecard - Michael Daider /Reuters
Markus Braun, former chief executive of Wirecard – Michael Daider /Reuters

Germany’s accounting watchdog is set to be stripped of its powers in the wake of the Wirecard scandal. 

The government will end its contract with the Financial Reporting Enforcement Panel (FREP) as soon as Monday, according to reports.

The job of overseeing company accounts will be taken on by Bafin, Germany’s financial regulator. 

“We have reached an agreement with the Finance Ministry to terminate the contract,” a Justice Ministry official told the Bild am Sonntag newspaper

Germany has been rocked by the collapse of payments company Wirecard, which filed for insolvency last week after admitting that €1.9bn (£1.7bn)  of cash on its balance sheet probably didn’t exist

Markus Braun, chief executive of the Dax-listed company, resigned on June 19 and was then arrested on suspicion of accounting fraud and market manipulation. 

German authorities are facing questions over

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Should Value Investors Choose WhiteHorse Finance (WHF) Stock?

Value investing is easily one of the most popular ways to find great stocks in any market environment. After all, who wouldn’t want to find stocks that are either flying under the radar and are compelling buys, or offer up tantalizing discounts when compared to fair value?

One way to find these companies is by looking at several key metrics and financial ratios, many of which are crucial in the value stock selection process. Let’s put WhiteHorse Finance, Inc. WHF stock into this equation and find out if it is a good choice for value-oriented investors right now, or if investors subscribing to this methodology should look elsewhere for top picks:

PE Ratio

A key metric that value investors always look at is the Price to Earnings Ratio, or PE for short. This shows us how much investors are willing to pay for each dollar of earnings in

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